Wet weekend and a runny nose

Black & White Photography, Colour Photography, Landscapes, Landscapes, Production

I am sorry to say the weekend has seen me laid up in bed with a head cold and runny nose but Sunday afternoon I gave myself the task of trying to tone some images that I had taken earlier on in the week. This meant using the original image and using Lightroom to either use presets or develop my own tone presets which I much preferred. I am currently using Lightroom 1.3, some may say it is time to upgrade and I can agree but I have not been really into using these digital tools to manipulate an image but I have to think that in Lightroom 3.0 there are 21 very useful presets that reflect the use of filters used on 35 mm film. The intent with Lightroom’s use of filtering is to mimic the effect of placing a coloured filter over the end of the lens while using black and white film. These filters had a number of functions depending on the scene being shot. To simplify the overall process, a black and white photo is a rendition of the colour scene on a scale of gray, from black to white. Rarely is the photograph black or white, it is more often than not a wide range of gray.

Any colour filter placed on a lens will make the gray rendition of that color become lighter, while the other colours, especially complimentary colours, will become darker on the gray-scale.

ORIGINAL IMAGE ABOVE

I am particularly interested in the effect of split toning after having recently read a book on Black and White photography by Michael Freeman published by Ilex Press Split toning techniques are used to obtain different colours for the highlight and shadow areas of prints – by using two toners one after the other. When toning, it is the highlights of the print that are usually the first to change colour – and then the shadow areas. The second toner completes the toning process – and affects the shadows of the print.
Toner examples / effects
First Toner / Second Toner / Effect
Sepia / Blue / Sepia highlights, blue shadows, green mid-tones
Sepia / Selenium / Brown Purples
Selenium / Gold, Purple-blue mid tones
Blue / Selenium/ Blue shadows and buff highlights

TONED IMAGE ABOVE

From the time of the prints being made with a lens and emulsion, there was never a single standard for B&W photography, but I may be wrong. Therefore this is one of the great aspects of digital photography today; the photographer, print maker is free to explore how different shades of black and different shades of white work together for the best results.

ORIGINAL IMAGE ABOVE

TONED IMAGE ABOVE

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I am a self taught photographer based near Lewes, East Sussex . Loves: restoring old farmhouses, road cycling, sitting by log fires & French cooking .